The following bizarre, exotic and flimsy excuses have all been used by tardy taxpayers:

  1. My pet goldfish died (self-employed builder);

  2. I had a run-in with a cow (Midlands farmer);

  3. After seeing a volcanic eruption on the news, I couldn’t concentrate on anything else (London woman);

  4. My wife won’t give me my mail (self-employed trader);

  5. My husband told me the deadline was 31 March, and I believed him (Leicester hairdresser);

  6. I’ve been far too busy touring the country with my one-man play (Coventry writer);

  7. My bad back means I can’t go upstairs. That’s where my tax return is (a working taxi driver);

  8. I’ve been cruising round the world in my yacht, and only picking up post when I’m on dry land (South East man);

  9. Our business doesn’t really do anything (Kent financial services firm); and

  10. I’ve been too busy submitting my clients’ tax returns (London accountant).

All of these people and businesses received a £100 penalty from HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) for filing late. They appealed against the decision using these excuses, but were unsuccessful.

HMRC’s Director General of Personal Tax, Ruth Owen, said:

There will always be unforeseen events that mean a taxpayer could not file their tax return on time. However, your pet goldfish passing away isn’t one of them.

If you haven’t yet sent your 2012 to 2013 tax return to HMRC, you need to do it online and pay the tax you owe by the end of January. With all the help and advice available, there’s no excuse not to.

To send an online tax return, you must be registered for HMRC Online Services. This involves HMRC sending you an Activation Code in the post, so allow a few days for this to arrive. To register for HMRC Online Services go to www.hmrc.gov.uk/online and follow the on-screen instructions.

For general help and advice on completing a return, visit www.hmrc.gov.uk/sa or call the Self Assessment helpline on 0300 200 3310 (open 8.00am to 8.00pm, Monday to Friday, and from 8.00am to 4.00pm on Saturdays).

This post was originally published on this site

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HM Government
Her Majesty's Government, commonly referred to as HM Government (HMG), the British Government or Whitehall (where most of its departments are located), is the central government of the United Kingdom. The Government is led by the Prime Minister, who selects all the remaining Ministers. The Prime Minister and the other most senior Ministers belong to the supreme decision-making committee, known as the Cabinet. The Government Ministers are all members of Parliament, and are accountable to it. The Government is dependent on Parliament to make primary legislation,which means that in practice a government must seek re-election at least every five years.The monarch selects as Prime Minister the leader of the party most likely to command a majority in Parliament. Under the uncodified British constitution, executive authority lies with the monarch, although this authority is exercised only by, or on the advice of, the Prime Minister and the Cabinet.The Cabinet members advise the monarch as members of the Privy Council. They also exercise power directly as leaders of the Government Departments. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government_of_the_United_Kingdom Date last accessed: 11/11/13

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